CAW may opt for parallel talks with automakers

Wed Aug 29, 2012 4:17pm EDT
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article
[-] Text [+]

(Reuters) - The Canadian Auto Workers union said on Wednesday it may break with tradition and continue contract talks with all three Detroit automakers simultaneously, instead of targeting one of them to tackle first to set a bargaining pattern for the others.

The union is currently meeting with the Canadian management of General Motors Co (GM.N: Quote), Ford Motor Co (F.N: Quote), and Chrysler FIA.MI in separate talks at a Toronto hotel.

"If we're making progress, we won't even talk about a target company," said Canadian Auto Workers National President Ken Lewenza. "I want to stay optimistic that we can get a deal."

If the simultaneous talks are not making progress, Lewenza said he will choose a target. But he denied media reports that he could wait to close to September 16 to make that call.

He said the decision would likely come at least five days before all three contracts expire on September 17 at 11:59 p.m. (0359 GMT). The union can strike any time after that.

In the past, the union has gone on strike more often at the target company than at the two that follow.

In the United States, the United Auto Workers said early in its 2011 contract talks with the Detroit automakers that it would seek to negotiate with all three companies simultaneously, but it ultimately settled on General Motors (GM.N: Quote) as its first target.

Canadian contract talks are expected to be tough, as companies seek to cut labor costs they say are the highest in the world, and the union argues that workers who helped keep the companies afloat during the financial crisis should share in the rewards of a return to profitability.

(Reporting by Allison Martell; Editing by Peter Galloway)

 
Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) President Ken Lewenza (L) and Chrysler Canada's Director, Manufacturing, Human Resources, Glenn Shagena prepare for contract negotiations, in Toronto, August 14, 2012.REUTERS/Brett Gundlock