Consumers more confident, less worried about jobs: global survey

Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:18pm EDT
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Susan Fenton

LONDON (Reuters) - Global consumer confidence rose in the second quarter with more optimistic perceptions about jobs, personal finances and spending intentions in the United States, China and Japan, a survey shows.

Indonesia remained the most bullish consumer market, followed by the Philippines, which pushed India into third place, according to the quarterly survey by global information and insights company Nielsen.

Portugal retained its position as the most pessimistic consumer market in the survey, which was taken before a political crisis in Portugal deepened. Hungary and Italy tied for the second most downbeat markets.

As government budget cuts, tax rises and high unemployment continued to weigh on households in Europe, consumer confidence declined in 14 of 29 European markets.

"The European consumer is in a holding pattern, and in fact, at Nielsen we see a distinct set of tiers with German consumers being the most confident, followed by consumers in the UK, France, and then Italy and Greece where confidence is both low and also falling," said Venktatesh Bala, chief economist at The Cambridge Group, a part of Nielsen.

The Nielsen Global Consumer Confidence Index rose 1 point in the second quarter to 94, after rising 2 points in the previous quarter. A reading below 100, however, signals consumers are pessimistic overall about the outlook.

Consumer morale improved in the United States, the world's biggest economy, reflecting increasing employment opportunities, higher home prices and a rising stock market, Bala said.

"When consumers feel richer and also more secure about getting a job or keeping their job, that naturally makes them more confident ... It's the reverse of what happened in 2008-2009 when job layoffs soared and house prices collapsed along with the bottoming of the stock market," Bala said.   Continued...

 
A job seeker looks at a job advertisement board at a Beijing talent service centre July 17, 2013. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon