Intel shows off wearable gadgets as chipmaker expands beyond PCs

Mon Jan 6, 2014 11:51pm EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Noel Randewich

LAS VEGAS (Reuters) - Intel CEO Brian Krzanich showed off wearable computing devices on Monday including earbuds that monitor your heart rate and a smart headset as the world's largest chipmaker tries to get back on track after missing out on smartphones.

With PC sales falling and smartphone growth tapering off, Intel and other technology companies are betting that movement-sensing bracelets, biometric patches and other wearable electronic devices may catch on with consumers and become major markets.

The evolving category is a major theme at this week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, with several companies expected to unveil their own versions of intelligent and connected clothing.

Intel dominates the PC industry, but it has been slow to adapt its processors for smartphones and tablets, markets now dominated by rivals like Qualcomm and Samsung Electronics.

The company has struggled in past attempts to expand beyond the PC arena. A years-long project to provide consumer TV services was shelved last year with its technology put up for sale and the company's mobile processors have barely made a dent in the global smartphone market even after major improvements to them.

After replacing former CEO Paul Otellini in May, Krzanich, a chip manufacturing and operations guru, created a new division focused on identifying future technology trends and making sure Intel is not caught off-guard again.

In his keynote presentation at the technology show, Krzanich introduced some of that group's early results, including sample gadgets that Intel is promoting to consumer device manufacturers.

"We're looking at a broad ecosystem of wearables, not just the device or the silicon," he said.   Continued...

 
Intel CEO Brian Krzanich introduces Intel's Edison, a new personal computer in the size of an SD card, during the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada January 6, 2014. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith