U.S. regulators failed to spot deadly GM defects that others saw

Sat Mar 22, 2014 5:55pm EDT
 
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By Julia Edwards, Eric Beech and Karl Plume

WASHINGTON/CHICAGO (Reuters) - Retired Wisconsin state trooper Keith Young and his wife were sitting at the kitchen table last month when a story on the evening news jarred them: General Motors Co was recalling 1.6 million vehicles for faulty ignition switches.

Young said the couple turned to each other immediately. "That's just like that crash over in St. Croix County in 2006," they said.

The October 2006 crash of a Chevy Cobalt stayed with Young, who spent 20 years as a specialist in accident reconstruction. The car, driven by 17-year-old Megan Ungar-Kerns, lurched and hit a telephone box and two trees. No airbags deployed, and her two passengers were killed. None was wearing a seatbelt.

Young sent a report to the U.S. vehicle safety agency, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, with his finding that the ignition had been turned from "run" to the "accessory" position prior to the crash, shutting off the car's engine and disabling the airbags.

But NHTSA, which is responsible for keeping dangerous vehicles off the road, did not act until after the GM recall in February of this year, when the agency began investigating the timeliness of the automaker's handling of the safety defects.

The agency now finds itself under intense scrutiny for failing to spot a defect blamed for at least 12 deaths since 2005.

Consumer safety groups say NHTSA should have pressured GM to order a recall as early as 2007. The agency's acting chief, David Friedman, has been called to testify before a House of Representatives panel in April looking into whether NHTSA failed to heed warning signs. A Senate panel is also planning hearings.

FEDS SAY REPORTS "INCONCLUSIVE"   Continued...

 
Retired Wisconsin State Trooper Keith Young stands on highway 40 in Elk Mound, Wisconsin March 22, 2014. REUTERS/Andy Clayton-King