Guatemala sees opium poppies as potential revenue-spinners

Wed May 7, 2014 4:52pm EDT
 
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By William Schomberg

LONDON (Reuters) - Guatemala is considering the possibility of earning taxes from the sale of opium poppies to help fund drug prevention programmes and other social spending, the country's interior minister said on Wednesday.

The Central American state is looking at ways to legalize poppy and marijuana production, part of a broader shift in attitudes across Latin America away from the huge financial and social costs of the U.S.-backed war on drugs.

"That is one idea that has been raised," said Mauricio Lopez Bonilla, a retired lieutenant colonel who served with Guatemala's special forces, when asked if the government would tax the sale of poppies if it opted to allow their cultivation for medical purposes.

"That option would mean raising taxes, fundamental resources for prevention, resources that could be used by the Guatemalan state for social development," he told Reuters in an interview.

Almost all of Guatemala's poppy production is concentrated in three municipalities located close to the border with Mexico and has been funded traditionally by Mexican drug gangs.

Lopez Bonilla said poppy cultivation was so widespread in those areas that a state clamp-down was hard to execute.

"If we followed the letter of the law, we would have to send the inhabitants of three municipalities to prison and that is impossible," he said, adding that eradication programmes destroy only around 10 percent of crops each year.

Lopez Bonilla was in Britain to take part in a conference on rethinking anti-drug policies at the London School of Economics.   Continued...

 
Poppy plants used to make heroin are seen at a clandestine plantation during a military operation in Sierra de Culiacan in the state of Sinaloa December 8, 2011. REUTERS/Bernardo Montoya