Facebook's Sandberg speaks at husband's memorial

Wed May 6, 2015 6:21am EDT
 
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By Sarah McBride and Yasmeen Abutaleb

STANFORD, Calif (Reuters) - Facebook Inc Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg re-emerged in public on Tuesday after the accidental death of her husband last week, offering a personal tribute to him in a Silicon Valley memorial service and on her Facebook page.

Many of the tech world's top executives filled a 1,700-seat auditorium at Stanford University to commemorate David Goldberg, chief executive of SurveyMonkey. He died at age 47 on Friday after a treadmill accident during a vacation in Mexico.

"We had 11 truly joyful years of the deepest love, happiest marriage, and truest partnership that I could imagine," Sandberg posted on Facebook. "He gave me the experience of being deeply understood, truly supported and completely and utterly loved - and I will carry that with me always."

Her post appeared hours after the ceremony, a tribute to the low-key executive, whose marriage to Sandberg added to his fame from building a company valued at $2 billion.

Speakers described Goldberg's self-deprecation, modesty and selflessness, and the event, closed to the media, included several nods to his passions.

On their way out, guests were offered Minnesota Vikings baseball caps as a reminder of the Minneapolis-born Goldberg's lighthearted nature and love of sports, according to a person who attended the service and who declined to be identified.

Also on hand were playing cards stamped with his initials, and poker chips. During the ceremony, U2’s Bono sang "One," the Irish rock band’s anthem to love and support.

Goldberg's brother, Robert Goldberg, who announced the death on Saturday morning on Facebook, and several friends spoke at the private service, the person said.   Continued...

 
File photo of Sheryl Sandberg, Chief Operating Officer (COO) of Facebook, with her husband David Goldberg, CEO of SurveyMonkey at a media conference in Sun Valley, Idaho July 9, 2014. REUTERS/Rick Wilking