Oil demand won't peak before 2040, despite Paris deal: IEA

Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:49am EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Amanda Cooper

LONDON (Reuters) - The International Energy Agency expects global oil consumption to peak no sooner than 2040, leaving its long-term forecasts for supply and demand unchanged despite the 2015 Paris Climate Change Agreement entering into force.

The Paris accord to cut harmful emissions seeks to wean the world economy off fossil fuels in the second half of the century in an effort to limit the rise in average world temperatures to "well below" 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times.

But while demand for oil to power passenger cars, for example, may drop, other sectors may offset this fall.

"The difficulty of finding alternatives to oil in road freight, aviation and petrochemicals means that, up to 2040, the growth in these three sectors alone is greater than the growth in global oil demand," the IEA said in its annual World Energy Outlook.

From 2020, the European Union will impose much tougher legislation to control vehicle emissions, which many expect to quickly erode use of traditional fuels such as gasoline and diesel, a major source of oil demand.

In the report, the IEA looks at three scenarios for oil supply and demand. Its central, or "New Policies", scenario assumes signatory countries will attempt to meet the requirements set by Paris, as well as existing environmental legislation, while its "450 scenario" assumes signatories will adhere to the agreement and oil demand will fall off sharply and the "current policies" scenario does not factor in the Paris deal.

The IEA's central scenario assumes demand will reach 103.5 million barrels per day by 2040 from 92.5 million bpd in 2015, for which India will be the leading source of demand growth and China will overtake the United States to become the single largest oil-consuming nation.

Overall, under the New Policies scenario, the IEA said it sees non-OECD oil demand growth running at the slowest pace for more than 20 years, but this would still be enough to offset a continued fall in OECD country demand, which will be tempered by policies aimed at improving vehicle fuel efficiency.   Continued...

 
An employee holds a gas pump at a petrol station in Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 8, 2016.   REUTERS/Paulo Whitaker/File Photo