Trump to order U.S. Treasury to delve into taxes, post-crisis reforms

Fri Apr 21, 2017 3:12pm EDT
 
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By Lisa Lambert

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump will order the Treasury on Friday to find and reduce tax burdens and review post-financial crisis reforms that banks and insurance companies have said hinder their ability to do business.

A White House official said on Thursday that Trump will issue an executive order directing the Treasury on the tax issues. He will also issue two memoranda asking for reviews of two parts of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform law - the Orderly Liquidation Authority that sets out how big banks can wind down during a crisis and the Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC), which is made up of the country's top regulators.

The orders, which Trump will sign at the Treasury Department, next door to the White House, comes as the president works toward making good on a major campaign promise to lower taxes.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin will review significant tax regulations issued in 2016 to determine if any impose an undue financial burden on American taxpayers, add undue complexity or exceed statutory authority, the official's statement said.

Mnuchin said earlier on Thursday that Treasury is working on tax reform "day and night" and will soon create a sweeping overhaul.

Congress recently failed in efforts to make good another Trump campaign promise to reform healthcare.

House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan said this week that the country's first tax overhaul in decades may not be done until well into 2017. The review that Trump is ordering gives the administration a way to approach the issue independent of Congress.

The liquidation authority and the FSOC were both created as part of the Dodd-Frank law intended to prevent a repeat of the 2007-09 financial crisis, when the U.S. government injected billions of dollars in aid into failing banks to keep them from destroying the country's economy.   Continued...

 
U.S. President Donald Trump (L) arrives with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin prior to signing financial services executive orders at the Treasury Department in Washington, U.S., April 21, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque