U.S. stock futures up, euro sags as markets eye Greece

Mon Jun 29, 2015 7:46pm EDT
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Lisa Twaronite

TOKYO (Reuters) - U.S. stock futures edged up and the euro sagged in early Asian trading on Tuesday as Greece lurched toward defaulting on a debt payment due later in the session, raising the likelihood of the cash-strapped nation's exit from the euro zone.

Greece will not pay a 1.6 billon euro loan installment due the International Monetary Fund on Tuesday, a Greek government official told Reuters, after talks between Athens and its creditors broke down over the weekend when Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras called a surprise referendum on the austerity plan.

"The Greek government's willingness to walk into the fire is a dangerous proposition for Europe and the global markets," Kathy Lien, managing director of FX strategy for BK Asset Management in New York, said in a note to clients.

Ratings agency Standard and Poor's cut Greece's sovereign debt rating one notch further into junk levels to CCC-, saying there was a 50 percent probability it would leave the euro zone.

U.S. stock futures were up about 0.2 percent ESc1 in Asia, suggesting that a semblance of stability could return to markets after steep losses in the previous session.

In overnight trading on Wall Street, all three major stock indices tumbled, with the Dow Jones industrial average .DJI shedding 1.95 percent, the S&P 500 .SPX losing 2.09 percent and the Nasdaq Composite .IXIC dropping 2.4 percent.

The euro fell to a one-month low of $1.0955 EUR=EBS on the EBS trading platform on Monday and then reversed direction in North American trade as investors exited their euro-short positions, pushing the common currency as high as $1.1279. It was last down about 0.2 percent on the day at $1.1215.

Until volatility spiked due to developments in the Greek crisis, investors had used the euro to fund carry trades - a strategy of borrowing in a low-yielding currency to buy higher-yielding assets.   Continued...

 
A woman stands in front of a display showing market indices at the Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) in Tokyo June 29, 2015. REUTERS/Thomas Peter