Exclusive: Deutsche Bank to cut workforce by a quarter - sources

Mon Sep 14, 2015 10:38am EDT
 
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By Thomas Atkins and Kathrin Jones

FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Deutsche Bank aims to cut roughly 23,000 jobs, or about one quarter of total staff, through layoffs mainly in technology activities and by spinning off its PostBank division, financial sources said on Monday.

That would bring the group's workforce down to around 75,000 full-time positions under a reorganization being finalised by new Chief Executive John Cryan, who took control of Germany's biggest bank in July with the promise to cut costs.

Cryan presented preliminary details of the plan to members of the supervisory board at the weekend. A spokesman for the bank declined comment.

Deutsche's share price has suffered badly under stalled reforms and rising costs on top of fines and settlements that have pushed the bank down to the bottom of the valuation rankings of global investment banks. It has a price-book ratio of around 0.5, according to ThomsonReuters data.

The bank unveiled a broad restructuring plan in April but co-chief executives Anshu Jain and Juergen Fitschen quit shortly afterwards, handing over its execution to Cryan.

"This is the first time ever that you had the feeling that somebody is talking straight," said one of the sources. "But the problem is he has to deliver soon."

Deutsche is mainly reviewing cuts to the parts of its technology and back office operations that process transactions and work orders for staff who deal with clients.

A significant number of the roughly 20,000 positions in that area will be reviewed for possible cuts, a financial source said. Back-office jobs in the group's large investment banking division will be concentrated in London, New York and Frankfurt, the source said.   Continued...

 
A 'No U-turn' traffic sign stands in front of Deutsche Bank headquarters in Frankfurt, Germany June 9, 2015. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski