VW says fuel usage understated on some models; Porsche warns

Tue Nov 3, 2015 7:01pm EST
 
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By Andreas Cremer and Victoria Bryan

BERLIN (Reuters) - Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE: Quote) on Tuesday said it had understated the fuel consumption of 800,000 cars sold in Europe, while majority stakeholder Porsche Automobil Holding SE (PSHG_p.DE: Quote) warned that VW's latest findings could further weigh on its results.

The latest revelation about fuel economy and carbon dioxide emissions, which Germany's largest automaker said represented a roughly 2 billion euro ($2.19 billion) economic risk, deepened the crisis at VW.

The scandal initially centered on software on up to 11 million diesel vehicles worldwide that VW admitted vastly understated their actual emissions of smog-causing pollutant nitrogen oxide.

U.S. environmental regulators said on Monday that similar "defeat devices" were installed on larger 3.0 liter engines used in luxury sport utility vehicles from Porsche and Audi, although VW has denied those allegations.

Porsche's North American unit said it was discontinuing sales of Porsche Cayenne diesel sport utility vehicles until further notice, citing the allegations.

The latest findings that VW understated fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, areas which U.S. regulators have yet to address, were disclosed as VW continues a broad review of its handling of all pollution-related issues. While the findings mostly apply to smaller diesel engines, one gasoline-powered engine is also affected.

"VW is leaving us all speechless," said Arndt Ellinghorst of banking advisory firm Evercore ISI. "It seems to us that this is another issue triggered by VW's internal investigation and potentially related to Europe."

The carmaker said it would immediately start talking to "responsible authorities" about what to do about the latest findings.   Continued...

 
The Volkswagen logo is seen at a power plant in Wolfsburg, Germany in this September 22, 2015 file photo. REUTERS/Axel Schmidt/Files