Exclusive: Russia sees oil price of $45-$50 per barrel 'acceptable' as it prepares for freeze deal - sources

Wed Apr 6, 2016 3:39pm EDT
 
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By Vladimir Soldatkin

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russia believes an oil price at $45-$50 per barrel is acceptable to allow the global oil market to balance, as it prepares to meet leading oil producers in Doha later this month, sources familiar with Russian plans said on Wednesday.

Leading oil producers plan to meet in Doha on April 17 to cement a preliminary deal reached between Russia, Venezuela, Qatar and Saudi Arabia in February to freeze oil output at levels reached in January, to curb a surplus on the oil market.

"Now there is discussion of how long production will be frozen and ways to monitor the agreement," one of the sources said.

"The level of $45-50 (per barrel) is acceptable from the point of view of market balance: if prices go higher shale oil production could start to recover."

A Russian Energy Ministry spokeswoman confirmed that the information provided by the sources was correct.

Oil producers such as Russia and Venezuela are highly dependent on energy revenues, with their state budgets at risk after global oil prices fell to under $40 per barrel from over $115 in June 2014.

The Doha meeting is expected to bring together major oil producers, including the ex-Soviet nations Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan, which along with Russia have seen their currencies falling sharply on weak oil.

The key question concerns Iran, which saw its oil output curtailed for years by sanctions that have been lifted this year, and wants to bring its output to pre-sanctions levels before sticking to any agreement. Tehran plans to attend the Doha meeting, Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak said this week.   Continued...

 
A worker takes oil samples from a well at the Gazpromneft-owned Yuzhno-Priobskoye oil field outside the West Siberian city of Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia, in this January 28, 2016 file photo.  REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin/Files