Lighten up: tech firms take on economy-class flight challenge

Wed Oct 26, 2016 5:37am EDT
 
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By Jeremy Wagstaff

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Some start-ups are taking on one of air travel's last undisrupted bastions - the economy-class cabin. While first and business class travelers have long enjoyed comfort upgrades, there's been less attention to innovation at the rear of the plane.

"We want to make travel memorable and comfortable for all of us, not just the top 1 percent," Alireza Yaghoubi, founder of Singapore-based AirGo, told a recent start-up conference to pitch his superlight economy-class seat.

He's not alone. Half a dozen firms are pitching something similar, wanting to make seats more comfortable, improve cabin lighting, make it easier to use and charge mobile devices on flights, and even upgrade the humble food trolley.

They are trying to penetrate an industry eyeing significant growth on the back of strong jetliner demand, illustrated by this week's $6.4 billion deal for Rockwell Collins (COL.N: Quote) to take over B/E Aerospace BEAV.O, an interiors manufacturer.

Persuading the airline industry to upgrade, however, is a tough ask. In a fiercely competitive market and with single-digit margins, carriers have gone as far as they can with economy-class innovation, says Anthony Harcup of Acumen, a UK design house that works with planemakers and airlines.

"Right now, we've designed ourselves into a corner with the current economy format," he says. "It's about as tight and tiny as you're going to get it. So something has to give, and it's difficult to see what that is."

Acumen, which designed the world's first flat bed for British Airways (ICAG.L: Quote) 20 years ago, has had only two of its in-cabin concepts lie unused: both involved re-thinking the form and layout of economy-class seats.

But that's not stopping a new generation of outsiders working with new materials and technologies to make economy class, if not luxurious, at least more bearable.   Continued...

 
A view of Airgo's 3D printed prototype of their Orion long-haul aircraft seats at their manufacturing facility in Singapore October 7, 2016. Picture taken October 7, 2016.  REUTERS/Edgar Su