Europe eyes buoying banks to weather debt storm

Sat Oct 8, 2011 5:02pm EDT
 
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By Carmel Crimmins and Jonathan Gould

DUBLIN/FRANKFURT (Reuters) - European banks may need more than 100 billion euros ($135 billion) to withstand the sovereign debt crisis, Ireland estimated on Saturday ahead of a meeting between German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Nicolas Sarkozy to work out how to recapitalize the lenders.

The falling value of banks' holdings of government debt from Greece and other euro zone periphery states has already provoked the implosion of Belgian lender Dexia, adding urgency to the Merkel-Sarkozy talks.

"There is a high risk that this crisis further escalates and broadens," German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble told German paper Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung in an interview released in advance of publication on Sunday.

Germany and France have so far been split over how to strengthen shaky lenders and fight financial market contagion that may follow a possible Greek default.

Paris is keen to tap the euro zone's 400 billion rescue fund, the EFSF, to recapitalize its own banks, while Berlin is insisting the fund should be used as a last resort.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has said European banks need 200 billion euros in additional funds.

Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan said the capital needed to bolster banks' cushions was likely to come from a variety of sources but the total bill would be large.

"I think there is general agreement that it will be significantly in excess of 100 billion (euros)," Noonan told reporters on the sidelines of an economic forum in Dublin.   Continued...

 
<p>International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde (L) and German Chancellor Angela Merkel address a news conference after meeting to discuss reform of the international monetary system in Berlin October 6, 2011. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch</p>