CANADA FX DEBT-Surprisingly strong exports lift C$ off 11-year low

Wed Aug 5, 2015 9:37am EDT
 
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* Canadian dollar at C$1.3142, or 76.09 U.S. cents
    * Bond prices lower across the maturity curve

    By Alastair Sharp
    TORONTO, Aug 5 (Reuters) - The Canadian dollar pulled back
from an 11-year low against its U.S. counterpart on Wednesday as
data showed the country's trade deficit narrowed sharply in June
due to soaring exports.
    The trade shortfall for the month was far less than analysts
had expected and, coupled with disappointing U.S. private-sector
jobs data, helped push the loonie back below C$1.32 to the
greenback. 
    The improvement in the trade data was "very surprising and
quite large in magnitude," said Don Mikolich, executive director
of foreign exchange sales at CIBC World Markets. "It makes you
wonder if we're finally getting some traction from the
currency." 
    The cheaper currency, with the Canadian dollar hitting its
weakest level since 2004 this week, has been expected to lift
Canadian exports, though a significant time lag has been
expected.
    At 9:19 a.m. EDT (1319 GMT), the Canadian dollar 
was at C$1.3142 to the greenback, or 76.09 U.S. cents, stronger
than the Bank of Canada's official close on Tuesday of C$1.3180,
or 75.87 U.S. cents.
    The currency's strongest level of the session was C$1.3110,
while its weakest was C$1.3213.
    Mikolich said the data helped prompt "a needed correction
with the move higher in the last couple of sessions, but with
limited scope here much below C$1.31."
    Canadian government bond prices were lower across the
maturity curve, with the two-year price down 4
Canadian cents to yield 0.424 percent and the benchmark 10-year
 falling 26 Canadian cents to yield 1.455 percent.
    The Canada-U.S. two-year bond spread was -30.8 basis points,
while the 10-year spread was -79.5 basis points.
    U.S. crude prices were up 0.9 percent at $46.17 a
barrel, while Brent crude added 1.1 percent to
$50.55. Oil is a major Canadian export.

 (Reporting by Alastair Sharp; Editing by Peter Galloway)