CANADA FX DEBT-C$ holds weaker after Bernanke comments

Fri Aug 26, 2011 11:19am EDT
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 * C$ cuts losses, at C$0.9879, or $1.0122
 * Bonds mixed, some optimism found in Bernanke comments
 * Bernanke says Fed prepared to use tools to spur growth
 (Updates with reaction after Bernanke speech)
 By Ka Yan Ng
 TORONTO, Aug 26 (Reuters) - The Canadian dollar held weaker
against the U.S. currency on Friday morning after U.S. Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, in an eagerly awaited speech,
offered no details on stimulus options that could be used to
provide further support to the U.S. economy.
 Bernanke stopped short of signaling further action to boost
growth, but he said the U.S. central bank has "a range of
tools" it could use. He also said it was critical for the
economy's health to reduce long-term joblessness.
[ID:nW1E7JM00N] [ID:nN1E77P0HL]
 The Canadian dollar, often referred to as a commodity
currency, fell to a one-week low against the greenback at
C$0.9923 to the U.S. dollar, or $1.0078, shortly after
Bernanke's comments, then pared losses. The greenback made
greater gains against the Swiss franc and the euro.
 "It looks like the commodity bloc is basically taking it in
a rather blase fashion," said David Watt, senior currency
strategist at RBC Capital Markets.
 "I'm actually somewhat surprised that the (U.S.) dollar's
rallying because I think he opened the door to more
quantitative easing but maybe with regard to the commodity
currencies, he hasn't necessarily said he's going to do more
and he talked somewhat optimistically about the backdrop."
 At 10:52 a.m. (1452 GMT), the Canadian currency CAD=D4
was at C$0.9879 to the U.S. dollar, or $1.0122, down from
C$0.9868 to the U.S. dollar, or $1.0134, at Thursday's close.
 Canadian government bond prices were mixed on shades of
optimism in Bernanke's speech, which sent some stock market
indexes into positive territory.
 The two-year bond CA2YT=RR was off 1 Canadian cent to
yield 1.003 percent, while the 10-year bond CA10YT=RR climbed
10 Canadian cents to yield 2.394 percent.
 (Reporting by Ka Yan Ng; editing by Peter Galloway)