Russia's Putin denies large-scale Olympic corruption

Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:26am EST
 
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By Thomas Grove

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian President Vladimir Putin denied that any large-scale corruption surrounded the Sochi Winter Olympics and challenged those with allegations of misconduct to come forward with proof.

Western and Russian opposition critics have made allegations that large amounts of money have been stolen during construction for the 2014 Olympics in the Black Sea city, but have provided little concrete evidence.

Some Olympic subcontractors have said corruption has been endemic during preparations for the games, which start on February7.

"We don't see any large-scale instances of corruption during our preparations ...in Sochi. If anyone has any information about corruption in Sochi, please hand it over, we will be glad and grateful," Putin said in an interview with ABC, BBC and Russian and Chinese journalists broadcast on Sunday.

"A few years ago local bureaucrats tried to buy and sell land intended for Olympic venues. Investigations were carried out, these people were tried by Russian courts and are serving their punishments."

Russia has spent more than $50 billion on preparations for the Winter Games, making them the most expensive in Olympic history. Putin's government hopes to show the world a modern face of Russia, which has faced increased criticism from the West over human rights.

A law passed last year banning the promotion of homosexuality among minors has drawn criticism from the West and human rights activists. Calls for a mass boycott of the games have failed, but the row has clouded the build-up to the event.

Critics say the law is discriminatory and part of a rolling back of human rights and democratic freedoms under Putin, who has taken a more conservative course on social issues since returning to the presidency in mid-2012 [ID:nL5N0KR2SF]   Continued...

 
Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to a journalist's question during a televised news conference in Sochi January 19, 2014. REUTERS/Alexei Nikolsky/RIA Novosti/Kremlin