U.S. men edge Russians in ice hockey thriller, but skaters fail again

Sat Feb 15, 2014 3:48pm EST
 
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By Mike Collett-White

SOCHI, Russia (Reuters) - The United States edged out host nation Russia in a thrilling men's ice hockey game at the Winter Olympics on Saturday, but a last-minute switch of high-tech suits failed to propel American speed skaters to their first medal of the Sochi Games.

Ice hockey mania gripped the Sochi Games on another warm, sunny day on the Black Sea coast, as two of the sport's heavyweights met in a match redolent of rivalries past.

Russian President Vladimir Putin watched the game, and later visited compatriot and skicross racer Maria Komissarova, who underwent 6-1/2 hours of surgery after breaking her back in a training crash in the mountains.

The president spoke to the 23-year-old, who is conscious, after her operation, and telephoned her father to reassure him that she was getting the best care possible.

Komissarova suffered the injury during training at the PSX Olympic skicross venue at Rosa Khutor Extreme Park. She was taken to Krasnaya Polyana Hospital Number 8, specially built for the Olympics, where doctors decided to operate.

"During one of her training runs, Maria injured her spine," team head of press Mikhail Verzhba said. "It is a serious injury."

At the futuristic Bolshoy Ice Dome back in Sochi, the hosts lost 3-2 after T.J. Oshie scored in the eighth round of the shootout to end an electrifying clash.

Evoking memories of the 1980 Lake Placid Olympics 'Miracle on Ice', when a group of American college players upset the then Soviet Union's 'Big Red Machine', the game delivered on everything it had promised.   Continued...

 
Team USA's T.J. Oshie scores on the team's fifth shootout attempt against Russia's goalie Sergei Bobrovski during their men's preliminary round ice hockey game at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympic Games February 15, 2014. REUTERS/Grigory Dukor