Federer helps Swiss win but coy on Davis Cup future

Sun Sep 20, 2015 3:56pm EDT
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(Reuters) - Roger Federer guided Switzerland to victory in their Davis Cup World Group playoff tie against the Netherlands with an easy 6-3 6-2 6-4 victory over Thiemo de Bakker on Sunday.

The 17-times grand slam champion, beaten by Novak Djokovic in the U.S. Open final a week ago, recovered after losing Saturday's doubles with Marco Chiudinelli to give the Swiss a decisive 3-1 lead and secure their World Group spot.

Switzerland, winners last year, were beaten by Belgium in the opening round in March when neither Federer nor Stan Wawrinka lined up for the Swiss.

Federer, however, could well decide to miss next year's Davis Cup.

"My idea was never to win it twice, the idea was always to win it once and we did that in front of a record crowd, which was a great moment for us all," Federer told the Davis Cup website (www.daviscup.com).

"I see this tie in isolation. Next year is an Olympic year. The summer will be very long and packed with highlights. It's all a question of priorities. I can't play everything and of course if I do play Davis Cup other things have to drop out."

In other playoff ties, the Czech Republic clinched a 3-1 victory against India in New Delhi, while the United States secured a winning 3-1 lead in Uzbekistan thanks to victory for Jack Sock against Denis Istomin.

Fabio Fognini led Italy against Russia in Irkutsk, beating Teymuraz Gabashvili in Sunday's first reverse singles as Italy eventually triumphed 4-1.

It proved to be a fantastic weekend for Fognini who won his singles match on Friday before helping Simone Bolelli to win Saturday's doubles encounter.   Continued...

Switzerland's Roger Federer (R) gets congratulations from Stan Wawrinka (C) and team captain Severin Luethi after winning his Group play-off tennis match against Theimo de Bakker of the Netherlands at the Palexpo Arena in Geneva, Switzerland September 20, 2015.  REUTERS/Denis Balibouse