IOC wants cheats punished in wake of doping report

Tue Nov 10, 2015 7:50pm EST
 
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By Toby Davis

LONDON (Reuters) - The International Olympic Committee (IOC) wants disciplinary procedures to be opened against athletes who have violated doping rules as the fallout continued on Tuesday from WADA's explosive report on the issue.

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) commission on Monday alleged widespread corruption and collusion by Russian officials, including state security services, to cover up drug test results, destroy samples and intimidate laboratory staff.

It also identified "systematic failures" by the sports world governing body, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF).

The IOC said competitors, coaches or officials mentioned in the WADA report who were proven to have violated doping regulations should be punished and stripped of any medals.

"The IOC has asked the IAAF to initiate disciplinary procedures against all athletes, coaches and officials who have participated in the Olympic Games and are accused of doping in the report of the independent commission," it said in a statement.

"With its zero-tolerance policy against doping, following the conclusion of this procedure, the IOC will take all the necessary measures and sanctions with regard to the withdrawal and re-allocation of medals and, as the case may be, exclusion of coaches and officials from future Olympic Games."

The former global athletics head Lamine Diack, who is under investigation in France on suspicion of corruption and money laundering, was also provisionally suspended by the IOC and resigned as International Athletics Foundation (IAF) chief.

  Continued...

 
A general view shows a building of the federal state budgetary institution "Federal scientific centre of physical culture and sports", which houses a laboratory led by Grigory Rodchenkov and accredited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), in Moscow, Russia, November 10, 2015. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin