CANADA FX DEBT-Canada dollar little changed, focus on Fed speakers

Mon Sep 23, 2013 9:49am EDT
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* C$ at C$1.0284 against U.S. dollar
    * With few catalysts, investors to parse Fed commentary
    * Bond prices mixed across the curve

    By Leah Schnurr
    TORONTO, Sept 23 (Reuters) - The Canadian dollar was little
changed on Monday as investors saw few reasons to place big bets
while they mulled the potential path of monetary policy south of
the border.
    An election win for Germany's Angela Merkel and upbeat
economic data from Europe and China failed to elicit much
response from the Canadian dollar. 
    "For Canada, it's just a matter of being stuck in the
middle," said Camilla Sutton, chief currency strategist at
Scotiabank. "We're seeing U.S. dollar weakness against some
currencies but all in all, things are pretty quiet as we enter
the new week."
    The Canadian dollar was at C$1.0284 to the U.S.
dollar, or 97.23 U.S. cents, slightly stronger than Friday's
session close of C$1.0299, or 97.10 U.S. cents. 
    Three Fed policymakers are scheduled to speak on Monday,
coming on the heels of a round of speeches late last week as
investors seek clarity into the central bank's decision to hold
the pace of its economic stimulus steady.
    Markets had been expecting a small reduction in the $85
billion worth of bonds the Fed is buying each month to prop up
the recovery.
    Among the Fed speakers last week, markets appeared to focus
on St. Louis Fed chief James Bullard's comments that the Fed 
could still decide to start trimming its stimulus at its next
meeting in October if economic data points to a pick up.
    "Overall there was damage to the communication credibility
coming from the Fed last week and on the back of that, markets
are likely to look at the accommodation of the data combined
with the Fed commentary," said Sutton.
    Prices for Canadian government bonds were mixed across the
maturity curve, with the two-year bond up 1 Canadian
cent to yield 1.223 percent, and the benchmark 10-year bond
 off 3 Canadian cents to yield 2.696 percent.