UPDATE 2-Canada allowed widespread NSA surveillance at 2010 G20 summit -report

Thu Nov 28, 2013 11:56am EST
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(Adds U.S. reaction, comments by head of Canadian signals agency)

By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA Nov 28 (Reuters) - Canada allowed the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) to conduct widespread surveillance during the 2010 Group of 20 summit in Toronto, according to a media report that cited documents from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

The report by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp is the latest potential embarrassment for the NSA as a result of Snowden's leaks, although it remains unclear precisely what information the agency was looking for during the summit.

Snowden has already revealed the agency spied on close allies such as Germany and Brazil, prompting heated diplomatic spats with Washington.

The CBC report, first aired late on Wednesday, cited briefing notes it said showed the United States turned its Ottawa embassy into a security command post during a six-day spying operation by the top-secret U.S. agency as President Barack Obama and other world leaders met that June.

Reuters has not seen the documents and cannot verify their authenticity. One of the bylines on the CBC report was Glenn Greenwald, the U.S. journalist who has worked with Snowden on several other NSA stories.

CBC said the operation was no secret to Canadian authorities and it quoted an NSA briefing note describing the operation as "closely coordinated with the Canadian partner".

The Canadian equivalent of the NSA is the Communications Security Establishment Canada, or CSEC.   Continued...