Canada backs U.S.: climate deal should not be legally binding

Fri Nov 27, 2015 3:51pm EST
 
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By David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canada on Friday backed the U.S. approach to major climate change talks in Paris, saying any carbon reduction targets agreed at the negotiations should not be legally binding.

The announcement by Environment Minister Catherine McKenna could irritate host nation France, which wants any deal to be enforceable.

That would be politically impossible for the administration of U.S. President Barack Obama, however, since it is clear the Republican-dominated Congress would not ratify any treaty imposing legally binding cuts on the United States.

"Everyone wants to see the United States be part of this treaty," McKenna told reporters on a conference call before flying to Paris.

"There are political realities in the United States ... they cannot have legally binding targets. We don't expect that the targets will be internationally legally binding," she said.

Signatories to a Paris agreement should agree to update their climate change goals every five years, she added.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry told the Financial Times this month that any deal reached in Paris was "definitively not going to be a treaty". His remarks drew a stern response from French President Francois Hollande.

Senior officials from almost 200 nations are due to meet from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 in the French capital, including new Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.   Continued...

 
Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on at the start of the Climate Action Special Executive Session at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Valletta, Malta, November 27, 2015.  REUTERS/Darrin Zammit Lupi