Canadian energy asset sales seen picking up in coming months

Wed Sep 14, 2016 1:16pm EDT
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By John Tilak

TORONTO (Reuters) - Canadian energy companies will likely sell more exploration and production assets in the next several months, driven by weaker producers shoring up their balance sheets and the longer-term prospect of oil prices stabilizing, deal advisers said.

Mergers and acquisitions activity in the Canadian energy patch has waned since oil prices began sliding more than two years ago. Many deals have involved so-called midstream assets such as pipelines, storage and processing facilities, which are more likely to offer steady cash flow.

The expected shift to the E&P, or upstream, segment, which tends to carry both higher risks and rewards, comes as companies that hoped to hold on to their prized assets are under more pressure than ever from lenders and bondholders.

"There are not as many buyers as there are sellers," said Janan Paskaran, partner at Torys LLP. "There's still a big pricing gap, and the only way for companies to get deals done is to let go of a crown jewel or one of their best assets."

The number of upstream energy deals in 2015 and so far in 2016 is below levels in 2014, data from Wood Mackenzie shows.

Large and mid-sized energy companies with the resources to buy assets, as well as private equity firms, have mostly shown restraint despite the oil price bloodbath. Some advisers say that will start to change.

"Energy producers are sitting on dry powder to deploy on E&P assets. The capital is waiting to be used," said Noralee Bradley, partner at Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP.

She predicts more asset sales in the exploration and production area, compared with the midstream deals seen in recent months.   Continued...

Maidstone well site about 60 kilometres east of field office during a tour of Gear Energy's well sites near Lloydminster, Saskatchewan August 27, 2015. REUTERS/Dan Riedlhuber