Canada environment minister resigns, to join CIBC

Thu Nov 4, 2010 5:59pm EDT
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

OTTAWA (Reuters) - Environment Minister Jim Prentice announced his resignation on Thursday, saying he will leave the high-profile government post for a senior position at Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.

Prentice said the time had come for him to leave public service, but he has been frequently mentioned as a possible contender for the Conservative Party leadership should Prime Minister Steven Harper decide to step aside.

"When I entered federal politics in 2001 I made a commitment that my time in politics would be eight to 10 years. It has now, remarkably, been nine years," he told the House of Commons in a surprise announcement.

"It is time for me to pursue new opportunities outside of public life," said Prentice, a lawyer from Calgary, Alberta, who will resign as environment minister immediately and leave Parliament by the end of the year.

Government House Leader John Baird will serve on an acting basis as environment minister, a position he has held in the past, and Prentice's resignation will not require a cabinet shuffle, the prime minister's office said.

The environment job of is one of the toughest in the minority Conservative government, which critics regularly attack for not caring enough about the environment or global warming, in a bid to protect economic interests such as Alberta's oil sands.

Prentice's resignation also comes after this week's Republican victories in U.S. midterm elections, which will likely stall any efforts by the White House to push through tighter climate change legislation.

The Conservative government has said any national action on reducing greenhouse gas emissions would have to be tied to reductions in the United States, which is Canada's largest trading partner by far.

Prentice drew mixed reviews from green groups.   Continued...

<p>Canada's Environment Minister Jim Prentice speaks during Question Period in the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa October 7, 2010. REUTERS/Chris Wattie</p>