Hollywood quiet so far on gun control after Connecticut

Tue Dec 18, 2012 5:51am EST
 
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By Jill Serjeant

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Pick a social cause and you'll often find a Hollywood celebrity speaking out. Gay marriage (Brad Pitt), Darfur (George Clooney), the environment (Robert Redford or Leonardo DiCaprio).

Gun control? Not so much.

Most of Hollywood's biggest action movie stars have remained silent, so far, on the divisive issue following last week's slaying of 20 young children and six adults at a Connecticut school. And pop culture experts say it's not hard to see why.

"If you are known for being a star who carries around weaponry and fires it, when something like this happens, the last thing in the world you want to do is insert yourself ... unless you say you are never going to star in another action-adventure movie," Robert Thompson, professor of popular culture at Syracuse University, said on Monday.

Longtime gun control advocates like actress Susan Sarandon and "Bowling for Columbine" documentary director Michael Moore were quick to take to Twitter after Friday's Connecticut massacre, and tens of thousands of Americans have since signed online petitions urging approval of stricter gun control laws.

Yet major action heroes Arnold Schwarzenegger, Bruce Willis, Denzel Washington, as well as Pitt and Clooney, have had little or nothing public to say.

That may change, according to a veteran public relations executive who handles many Hollywood clients.

"I think there will be a very public display of outrage from prominent people in the entertainment world and people wanting to do something about guns," said the public relations chief who asked not to be named because he was not authorized to speak for his clients.   Continued...

 
People stand by a makeshift memorial with a U.S. flag, honoring the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, in Newtown, Connecticut December 17, 2012. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton