Actress Helen Mirren turns ferocious in new 'Monsters' movie

Mon Jun 10, 2013 11:54am EDT
 
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By Belinda Goldsmith

LONDON (Reuters) - British actress Helen Mirren had no trouble transforming herself from monarch to menacing creature for the new "Monsters, Inc." animated movie, but said she's not so frightening in real life.

The 67-year-old veteran of stage and screen made headlines last month when she stormed out of a London theatre dressed as Queen Elizabeth to berate a group of drummers playing noisily outside in an expletive-riddled tirade. She later apologized.

However the actress, who lends her voice to the terrifying winged monster heading the School of Scaring in "Monsters University", said she does try not to seem scary after being intimidated by certain actors when her career started.

She was even wary she might alienate people when she was made a dame in 2003.

"People may look at me and think she is so scary... but it is not what you're trying to be," Mirren told a news conference on Friday ahead of the release of 3D "Monsters University".

The film is the prequel to Pixar and Disney's hit 2001 children's movie "Monsters, Inc." which made over $550 million at the international box office and is still one of the top 100 best earning movies.

The prequel goes back to when the small, green one-eyed monster Mike Wazowski (voiced by Billy Crystal) meets the huge, blue-and-purple monster Sulley (John Goodman) at Monsters University and the mismatched monsters can't stand each other.

Mirren voices Dean Hardscrabble, a dragon-like monster with a centipede body, who throws Wazowski and Sulley out of the School of Scaring, prompting them to join other monster misfits to compete in a Scare Games tournament and become best friends.   Continued...

 
British actress Helen Mirren takes part in a panel discussion of HBO's "Phil Spector" during the 2013 Winter Press Tour for the Television Critics Association in Pasadena, California, January 4, 2013. REUTERS/Gus Ruelas