'Carrie' returns, with more blood, revenge and a feisty makeover

Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:05pm EDT
 
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By Piya Sinha-Roy

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Carrie White, one of the most complex female villains of the horror film genre, is back in a new movie adaptation of Stephen King's cautionary tale of teen isolation and revenge, this time with a feistier actress, more blood and a dose of modern technology.

"Carrie," out in theaters on Friday and based on thriller writer King's first published novel from 1974, follows the story of an alienated high school girl with telekinetic powers, who rains down destruction on her tormenters after being doused by a bucket of blood at her high school prom.

The novel was adapted into a 1976 film by Brian De Palma, with Sissy Spacek in the starring role.

The new film, the third feature from director Kimberly Peirce, stars 16-year-old "Kick-Ass" star Chloe Grace Moretz in the title role. Julianne Moore plays her religious, fanatical and overprotective mother.

Unlike the 1976 film, which begins with Carrie menstruating for the first time in the girl's locker room at her high school, the latest adaptation starts at the beginning of Carrie's fraught, dysfunctional relationship with her mother, Margaret.

"I chose the fundamental concept of Carrie and her mother as a fight to the death because her mother is afraid that Carrie might be evil, and she's afraid that Carrie exposes her own sin," Peirce said in an interview.

Many of the scenes in Peirce's remake harken back to the 1976 original - the yellow-tiled showers in the locker room where Carrie has her first period appear in Peirce's version, as does the bloody handprint on the gym teacher's shorts, along with Tommy Ross' "to the devil with false modesty" line when the handsome high school athlete persuades Carrie to vote for the two of them as king and queen of the school prom.

The 37-year-gap between adaptations allows Peirce to put her own modern stamp on the classic story, she said. One example is when school bullies film Carrie's hysteria from her first menstruation on their cell phones and upload the video on YouTube - a link to modern-day teenage cyber-bullying.   Continued...