Documentary 'The Armstrong Lie' deconstructs cyclist's myth-making

Fri Nov 8, 2013 10:28am EST
 
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By Mary Milliken

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Filmmaker Alex Gibney was not alone in being duped by Lance Armstrong and his strident denials that he had doped and cheated his way to cycling's biggest prizes over the years.

But Gibney was in a unique position as the Oscar-winning documentary director who had set out to make what he called a "feel-good" film about Armstrong's comeback in the Tour de France in 2009. Known for tackling tough subjects like torture during war and the fall of energy company Enron, Gibney could take a lighter approach to a common theme for him - winning at all costs.

That feel-good film was scrapped once doping allegations snowballed, a federal investigation was launched and the United States Anti-Doping Agency confirmed he had cheated by doping. When Armstrong finally admitted as much to talk show host Oprah Winfrey earlier this year, the film was revived and resulted in a very different documentary called "The Armstrong Lie," which opens in U.S. theaters on Friday.

Gibney knew that with the remaking of the documentary, he himself would be a major player in the film.

"The story now was about Lance's myth-making process," Gibney told Reuters. "This was a lie that was hiding in plain sight because Lance was its curator and a very careful curator of his own myth."

Around a month before the Oprah interview, Armstrong called Gibney, told him he had lied and apologized. A few hours after talking to Oprah, he sat down with Gibney and talked about living "one big" lie. And that is how the film opens, with an uncomfortable Armstrong speaking in rambling fashion, never quite coming clean or owning up to one of the biggest cheating scandals in sport.

Gibney, nevertheless, manages to make good use of the footage from his original project called "The Road Back," taking the viewer on his journey on the 2009 Tour de France, where he had unparalleled access to Armstrong, who in turn would earn a share of the film's profits. Gibney was even allowed to interview the Italian doctor who Armstrong's critics believed was the brains behind the doping that took the cyclist from barely surviving cancer to winning the tour a record seven consecutive times.

"I think it was part of this plan for that year, which was 'Look at us. We are absolutely clean. We have nothing to hide'," said Gibney.   Continued...

 
Producer Frank Marshall attends a news conference for the film "The Armstrong Lie" at the 38th Toronto International Film Festival in this September 9, 2013, file photo. REUTERS/Fred Thornhill/Files