Jon Stewart joins Sept. 11 medical care push: first responders

Fri Sep 11, 2015 2:36pm EDT
 
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By Katie Reilly

NEW YORK (Reuters) - First responders who were injured or sickened by the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on New York and Washington said they will visit Congress with comedian Jon Stewart to push lawmakers to extend expiring medical programs as Friday marked 14 years since 9/11.

Activists believe the former host of "The Daily Show," who they say was instrumental in persuading Congress to pass the programs in the Zadroga Act of 2010, can again help their effort.

"We pitched a solid eight innings and then Jon Stewart came in and closed in 2010," said John Feal, founder of the Feal Good Foundation, which advocates for injured or ill 9/11 emergency personnel.

Feal and representatives from other first responder groups confirmed Stewart's involvement. Stewart was not immediately available for comment.

Nearly 3,000 people died when hijackers crashed planes into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and a Pennsylvania field on Sept. 11, 2001. Tens of thousands of firefighters, police officers and construction workers reported for months to clean up the site that became known as Ground Zero.

The World Trade Center Health Program, the part of the act that provides care to more than 70,000 responders, is set to expire in October.

Responders and advocates are pushing for a permanent extension and fear that anything less will eventually leave responders with financial burdens from expensive treatment.

In 2010, Stewart featured the bill, which had met strong Republican opposition in Congress, on "The Daily Show," interviewing four first-responders. The bill passed days later.   Continued...

 
Director Jon Stewart arrives at the Canadian premiere of "Rosewater" at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in Toronto, September 8, 2014.    REUTERS/Fred Thornhill