Tired of watching the grass grow? Norwegians watch the tide change

Fri Apr 15, 2016 7:28am EDT
 
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By Gwladys Fouche

OSLO (Reuters) - Stressed out by a fast-paced daily life and binge-watching the latest hit TV shows? Norway may have the answer with its latest slow TV installment: watching the ebb and flow of the sea, for twelve hours, without interruption.

Since 2009 Norwegian public broadcaster NRK has been experimenting with live, slow-paced programs, variously broadcasting a seven-hour train journey across Norway from east to west, a six-day trip by cruise ship from south to north or how to knit, starting with shearing a sheep.

Other countries have done similar things. Britain, for example, experimented with a narrow boat trip along a canal and a sleigh ride.

The shows have been hits with viewers in Norway, so its latest idea is to live broadcast the world's strongest tidal current, called Saltstraumen, near the city of Bodoe some 80 km (50 miles) north of the Arctic Circle.

"People will experience the calm of watching the current," said Gisle Forland, one of the two presenters of the show, due to be broadcast on May 20 from midday to midnight.

"It will be in the same style as the other (slow TV shows). We will show the nature, with the camera rolling and a little music, and people who tell about the history, the geology and the nature of Saltstraumen," he told Reuters.

Saltstraumen is a narrow strait linking two fjords where sea water can stream through at a speed of up to 40 km (25 miles) per hour, creating maelstroms famed at least since Viking times.

Lights, camera - not much action.

(Editing by Jeremy Gaunt)