Striking writers target Oscars and Globes

Tue Dec 18, 2007 3:44pm EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Steve Gorman

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The Academy Awards presentation is still two months away but the world's top film awards ceremony found itself embroiled on Tuesday in the worst Hollywood labor clash in two decades.

The screenwriters union, on strike since November 5 against major movie and TV studios, said it would deny waivers that would allow producers of the Academy Awards, as well as the Golden Globe Awards, to hire union writers for their shows.

Organizers of both awards said their shows would go on with or without the blessing of the Writers Guild of America.

Leslie Unger, spokeswoman for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, said it was too soon to say how the 80th annual Academy Awards on February 24 would be affected.

She said producers of the Oscars gala, which usually ranks as one of the year's highest-rated U.S. television broadcasts, might still seek an interim agreement with the WGA that would free the ceremony of strike sanctions.

"There are any number of possible options we might explore," Unger said.

For now the denial of an Oscar waiver means that unless the strike is settled in time, the internationally televised ceremony will be treated by the union as a "struck company," and someone other than WGA members would have to write any material delivered on the show by performers and presenters.

The same is true for the Golden Globes telecast, which is set for January 13, although producers of that show, sponsored by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, said they also would seek talks with the WGA for an interim deal on the ceremony.   Continued...

 
<p>The actual Oscar statues to be presented to winners are displayed in cases near the Kodak Theatre, site of the 78th annual Academy Awards, in Hollywood March 3, 2006. The Academy Awards presentation is still two months away but the world's top film awards ceremony found itself embroiled on Tuesday in the worst Hollywood labor clash in two decades. REUTERS/Gary Hershorn</p>