Was Bush lucky for U.S. soldier on TV game show?

Fri Apr 18, 2008 6:55pm EDT
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WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Did President George W. Bush bring luck to a soldier who was a contestant on the television game show "Deal or no Deal?" Stay tuned.

Bush taped a "surprise good luck video" in the White House Library on March 17 for Army Captain Joe Kobes who served in Iraq and was a contestant on the NBC show "Deal or No Deal," the White House said on Friday.

The program with Bush will air on Monday, April 21.

"The show's producers contacted the White House after learning from Captain Kobes that the president is one of his heroes," White House spokesman Tony Fratto said.

Kobes, an Army transportation officer, served three tours of duty in Iraq and received a Purple Heart for injuries after his truck was blown up in 2004, the White House said.

"The president thanked him for his service to his country and for serving in Iraq and wished him good luck," Fratto said. "And you'll have to watch the show to see how Captain Kobes did."

Contestants on "Deal or No Deal" choose one of 26 sealed briefcases hoping it holds a $1 million top prize. To find out what they win, players must open the other 25 briefcases hoping those contain smaller amounts.

Along the way, they get monetary offers from "the banker" on the show who hopes to make a "deal" that will buy them out for amounts less than the $1 million, at which point host Howie Mandel asks the contestant, "deal or no deal?" If they say "no deal," they can keep on trying to win the $1 million.

Contestants also bring family and friends on the show to provide support, and Bush's video appearance was intended to express his best wishes to Kobes.

"And it really is, actually, an emotional moment for Captain Kobes and the family. And so we look forward to that, and we all wish him luck as well," Fratto said.


<p>U.S. President George W. Bush gestures during an address to America's Small Business Summit in Washington April 18, 2008. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst</p>