McCain's daughter pens children's book on her father

Wed Jun 11, 2008 11:21pm EDT
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article
[-] Text [+]

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Meghan McCain, the daughter of Republican presidential candidate Senator John McCain, is writing a children's book about her father.

Publisher Simon & Schuster said in a statement on Wednesday that McCain, 23, had signed with imprint Aladdin Books for the yet-to-be-titled picture book that will hit stores the first week of September to coincide with the Republican National Convention.

"I am truly excited about the opportunity to write a children's book about my father, who is not only a fantastic dad, but also a great American," McCain, who runs her own blog McCain Blogette, said in a statement.

"This book will offer children the unique opportunity to see the character building events that happened over his lifetime, experiences that led up to his current bid to become the future President of the United States."

McCain, the eldest of John and Cindy McCain's three children, was born and raised in Phoenix and graduated from Columbia University in May last year after majoring in Art History.

She interned at Newsweek magazine and Saturday Night Live.

Her blog, McCain Blogette (, has received media attention but mixed reviews for chronicling her experiences on the campaign trail as well as her interests in fashion, music, and pop culture.

The publisher, which is part of the CBS Corp., said it will donate a portion of the proceeds from sales of this book to the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund that helps military personnel and veterans who have suffered severe traumatic brain injuries.

(Writing by Belinda Goldsmith, Editing by Bob Tourtellotte)

(To read more about our entertainment news, visit our blog "Fan Fare" online at

<p>Republican presidential candidate U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) greets supporters next to his wife Cindy (R) and his daughter Meghan (L) during a rally at Orlando's airport, Florida January 28, 2008. REUTERS/Carlos Barria</p>