Dennis Quaid settles with hospital on twins overdose

Tue Dec 16, 2008 3:55pm EST
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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Actor Dennis Quaid and his wife have reached a $750,000 settlement with a Los Angeles hospital over a life-threatening accidental overdose of their newborn twins with a blood thinner medication.

The settlement between the Quaids and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, one of the leading U.S. hospitals, was detailed in a document filed in Los Angeles Superior Court on Monday.

The Quaids' 2-week-old twins, Thomas Boone and Zoe Grace, were mistakenly given 1,000 times the recommended dose of the blood thinner Heparin while they were patients at Cedars-Sinai in November 2007.

Dennis Quaid, star of "Vantage Point" and "The Parent Trap," said the error made the twins' blood the consistency of water.

He said in May that they had nearly died but recovered within a week, although the long-term effects remain unknown.

The hospital apologized at the time of the error. Dennis and Kimberley Quaid did not sue Cedars-Sinai but named the hospital as a "potential defendant" in a lawsuit they brought against the maker of Heparin.

Cedars-Sinai officials were not immediately available to comment.

The settlement with Cedars-Sinai does not affect the Quaids' litigation against Heparin makers Baxter Healthcare Corp, a subsidiary of Illinois-based Baxter International Inc. The couple accused the company of failing to put clear distinguishing labels on its Heparin vials and failing to recall the product after other infants died in medical mix-ups.

The lawsuit against Baxter, filed in Illinois, was dismissed in part because the overdose took place in California. Monday's court documents said the Quaids may refile

the lawsuit in California.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis; Editing by Jill Serjeant and Eric Walsh)

<p>Dennis Quaid listens to remarks as he testifies before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on whether Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations should bar liability claims during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington May 14, 2008. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque</p>