Sade leads pop chart for second week

Wed Feb 24, 2010 1:49pm EST
 
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By Keith Caulfield

LOS ANGELES (Billboard) - Sade led the U.S. pop album chart for a second week on Wednesday as overall sales slid in the post-Valentine's day lull.

The British band's first album in almost 10 years, "Soldier of Love," sold 190,000 copies during the week ended February 21, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

The Billboard 200's highest debut came from rock band Story of the Year's "The Constant," way down at No. 42 with 14,000. Its previous release, "The Black Swan," started at No. 18 with 21,000 copies in April 2008. Eight new arrivals populated the top 40 last week.

Former chart-topper Lady Antebellum's "Need You Now" held at No. 2 with 144,000 copies and became the year's first million-selling album as it reached 1,041,000 in only its fourth week of release. It's the first title to sell a million so early in the year since the Game's "Documentary" hit a million in the fifth week of 2005.

The Black Eyed Peas' "The E.N.D." jumped five places to No. 3 with 65,000, Lady Gaga's "The Fame" rose three to No. 4 with 63,000, and Lil Wayne's "Rebirth" slipped one to No. 5 with 58,000.

Susan Boyle's "I Dreamed a Dream" rose three to No. 6 (51,000), Alicia Keys' "The Element of Freedom" rebounded five places to No. 7 (39,000), and Jaheim's "Another Round" fell five to No. 8 in its second week (36,000).

Country singer Josh Turner's "Haywire" fell four to No. 9, also in its second week (33,000), and Taylor Swift's "Fearless" held at No. 10 with (32,000).

Overall album sales totaled 6.53 million units, down 17% compared to the sum last week (7.83 million), and down 12% compared to the comparable sales week of 2009 (7.41 million). Sales so far this year are off 7% from the year-ago period at 45.05 million.

 
<p>British singer Sade looks out at the crowd at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas in this file photo dated July 27, 2001. REUTERS/Ethan Miller</p>