Rolling Stones revisit their days in "Exile"

Fri May 14, 2010 5:01pm EDT
 
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By Christine Kearney

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The Rolling Stones are revisiting their creative heights by releasing one of their greatest albums with 10 extra tracks, and reminiscing about their chaotic days in a grainy new documentary.

The British rockers have remastered "Exile on Main Street," a 1972 double album that boasts such concert favorites as "Tumbling Dice" and "Rocks Off." It comes out on Tuesday on the United States, and a day earlier everywhere else.

The new documentary, "Stones in Exile," released on June 22, offers snapshots and voice-overs of current and former band members and friends from the time when the band left Britain and its crippling income taxes for France, and recorded in the dank basement of Richards' French villa.

The period was rich with old material that was easily salvaged and turned into new songs, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards told Reuters in New York this week.

"We forgot about them," Richards said, laughing about why the band had waited so long to dig up the material. "And answer B is when we did finally get them, we said, 'We should finish them off,'... without touching the intrinsic sound of the tracks."

The bonus new songs that keep the rhythmic mix of rock, blues, soul, gospel and country sounds the album was famed for include "Following the River," "Dancing in the Light" and "Plundered My Soul," -- a song Rolling Stone magazine recently reviewed as "the real deal."

Jagger explained the new songs had been in raw form.

"Most of them didn't have any vocals, any top line melodies," he said. "So I just put those tracks through the process that the old ones were put through."   Continued...

 
<p>Rolling Stones band members (L-R) Charles Watts, Mick Jagger, and Keith Richards pose as they arrive for the premiere of the documentary film "Stones In Exile" in New York May 11, 2010. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson</p>