Sheen returns to "Two and a Half Men": reports

Tue May 18, 2010 2:03am EDT
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LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Charlie Sheen, the highest-paid actor in television, has agreed to return to "Two and a Half Men" for an additional two years, after suggesting he would walk away from the hit CBS sitcom as his private life spiraled out of control, reports said on Monday.

A spokesman for the network declined to comment on any contract extension, which was first reported by online news site TMZ. The CBS Corp unit is due to unveil its primetime lineup for next season on Wednesday.

Another online news site,, carried a quote attributed to Sheen: "To put a fitting end on the two and one-half months of whirlwind speculation, I'm looking forward to returning to my CBS home on Monday nights."

"Two and A Half Men" has just wrapped its seventh season as one of the most-watched sitcoms on U.S. television. Losing the program would have been a blow both to CBS and to the show's producer, Warner Bros. Television. The Time Warner Inc unit makes a mint from selling the show in syndication.

Sheen, Emmy-nominated four times for his art-imitating-life role as a sex-crazed bachelor Charlie Harper, is currently facing domestic violence charges in Colorado.

Last month, reports surfaced that he was seeking as much as $1 million per episode -- a substantial raise from his current level of $825,000 -- to continue on an eighth season. Sheen shot down the reported numbers, and said that if his role on the sitcom were to end, "so be it."

The 44-year-old actor was arrested in the ski resort of Aspen on Christmas Day, and later charged with assaulting and threatening his wife, Brooke Mueller. He has pleaded not guilty, and both he and Mueller have entered rehabilitation programs.

(Reporting by Dean Goodman, Editing by Miral Fahmy)

<p>Actor Charlie Sheen smiles at the CBS summer press tour party at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, July 15, 2006. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni</p>