Springsteen sheds some light on "Darkness" album

Wed Sep 15, 2010 3:21pm EDT
 
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By Frank Pingue

TORONTO (Reuters) - Rock legend Bruce Springsteen has thrown light on the making of his seminal album, "Darkness on the Edge of Town," describing it as a shift into adulthood for a small-town musician who wanted to be heard.

Interviewed by actor Edward Norton at the Toronto International Film Festival, Springsteen said he worked round the clock with his E Street Band in pursuit of perfection for the 1978 album that marked a shift in the musician's narrative voice.

Springsteen, who turns 61 next week, was in Toronto to mark the release of Thom Zimny's documentary "The Promise: The Making of Darkness on the Edge of Town", which made its world premiere at the festival on Tuesday.

The documentary focuses on the writing and recording sessions ahead of the 1978 release of "Darkness" and will be shown on cable TV channel HBO on October 7. It will also be part of a box set commemorating the album that comprises more than six hours of film and over two hours of audio.

In a grueling run-up to the record's release, Springsteen wrote 70 songs. He took only the best.

"I took the 10 toughest songs I had," Springsteen said in the hour-long on stage interview in front of a packed audience that hung on his every word.

"The way we did it was so hard we often thought we were doing it wrong. But I look back and I think we weren't doing it wrong, we were just doing it the only way we knew how."

He added "There was something in that hardness of it, that young naked desire. We wanted to be important and we came from a little town and we wanted people to hear our voices."   Continued...

 
<p>Musician Bruce Springsteen and his wife Patti Scialfa (R) arrive at the gala presentation for the film "The Promise: The Making Of Darkness On The Edge Of Town" at the 35thToronto International Film Festival September 14, 2010. REUTERS/Mike Cassese</p>