New Michael Jackson single prompts more controversy

Mon Nov 8, 2010 1:42pm EST
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By Jill Serjeant

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The first Michael Jackson single from a new December album was released on the Internet on Monday, sparking a new round of controversy over whether the voice is really that of the dead "Thriller" singer and if the track does him justice.

"Breaking News", a new song said by his record label to have been recorded by Jackson in 2007 and "recently brought to completion", opens with clips from old news reports about the more bizarre events in Jackson's life.

The song was released at the same time a rare TV interview with Jackson's mother, father and three children was broadcast on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" about their life after the singer's sudden 2009 death at age 50.

The "Breaking News" vocals, which feature many of Jackson's signature whoops and hee-hee's, are in a lower-register than the tone usually associated with the "King of Pop", and the lyrics start with the line "Everybody wanting a piece of Michael Jackson."

Jackson's Epic record label, part of the Sony Music Entertainment Group, said last week that after extensive research, they had "complete confidence" that the vocals on the new album are Jackson's own.

But Jackson's two eldest children are reported to have said they do not believe it is their father singing, and the entertainer's sister LaToya has also expressed doubts.

"I listened to it ('Breaking News')...It doesn't sound like him," LaToya Jackson was quoted as telling celebrity website

The new album "Michael" -- the first since Jackson's death and the first of new material since "Invincible" in 2001 -- is due to be released on December 14.   Continued...

<p>The cover art for a new album of previously unheard Michael Jackson songs which will be released on December 14, 2010, including a track the dead pop singer was said to be working on in 2007, is shown in this undated publicity photograph released by Sony Music November 4, 2010. REUTERS/Sony Music/Handout</p>