Dr. Drew: "I'm not addicted to fame"

Mon Apr 4, 2011 6:09pm EDT
 
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By Shirley Halperin

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Dr. Drew Pinsky premieres his new HLN talk show Monday night, adding another arm to his already flourishing media empire which includes the syndicated radio call-in show "Loveline," the VH1 reality hit "Celebrity Rehab" and a forthcoming daytime program ("Lifechangers" on the CW, slated to air in September).

Throw in appearances on every form of gab fest, and soon enough, Dr. Drew will be almost as inescapable as Ryan Seacrest -- no small feat. But dig deeper, as he does on a daily basis when helping his patients battle their addictions, and you soon learn that it's not about fame or fortune, though Dr. Drew says he does have an agenda.

BETWEEN YOUR MEDICAL PRACTICE AND ALL THE TV WORK, WE COUNT FIVE JOBS. IS THERE A BUSINESS PLAN IN PLAY FOR DR. DREW, INC.?

Dr. Drew Pinsky: There's never been a blueprint, I just keep exploring doors as they open. But whenever people would ask me what's my favorite thing to do, it was sitting in for Larry King. So the next phase is HLN and having the opportunity to do that kind of show, I'm very excited about. I hope we can create programing that makes a difference.

HOW WILL THE HLN SHOW WORK?

Pinsky: It looks at the people at the center of the story of the day and what is in the human experience. So dismantling why Charlie Sheen does what he does but really looking at it from different angles, be it a panel or people who have experienced or treated this kind of subject themselves.

YOU'VE GOTTEN SOME FLAK BEFORE FOR PRESENTING A DIAGNOSIS OF CELEBRITIES WHO YOU WEREN'T TREATING, INCLUDING LINDSAY LOHAN, WHO TWEETED "I THOUGHT REAL DOCTORS TALKED TO PATIENTS IN OFFICES BEHIND CLOSED DOORS." DOES THAT CONCERN YOU GOING INTO A SHOW BASED LARGELY AROUND OPINION?

Pinsky: It's bizarre to me that you can have political commentators, sports commentators, weather commentators, but with medicine, people go, "You can't do that." It's like, if you show me a picture of a rash, I don't have to know the person to tell you what that rash is. There are lots of medical conditions that you can diagnose never having met the person. Soon enough, we'll have telemedicine and do it through the Internet -- that's the future. You can educate people about politics, criminality, the law, but not about medicine? It's just silly ... I really don't want to hurt anybody, but to say the truth and to offer words that might be helpful in understanding what some of these conditions are. I can't see any reason not to do that. That's changing things for the better.   Continued...

 
<p>Drew Pinsky, host of the show "Dr. Drew," poses during the Turner Broadcasting Television Critics Association winter press tour in Pasadena, California January 6, 2011. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni</p>