UK hospital divulges Kate's condition in radio hoax

Wed Dec 5, 2012 10:59pm EST
 
Email This Article |
Share This Article
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
| Print This Article | Single Page
[-] Text [+]

By Michael Holden

LONDON (Reuters) - The London hospital treating Prince William's pregnant wife Kate for severe morning sickness admitted on Wednesday it had fallen for a prank call from an Australian radio station, relaying personal details about her condition.

Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, was admitted to the King Edward VII Hospital in central London on Monday suffering from Hyperemesis Gravidarum, very acute morning sickness which causes severe nausea and vomiting.

News of her pregnancy and her hospitalization has generated a worldwide media frenzy with journalists excitedly reporting any update on her condition along with the facial expressions of William when he arrives and departs.

However, two presenters from the Australian 2Day FM radio station managed to go one step further after calling the hospital pretending to be William's grandmother Queen Elizabeth and his father, the heir-to-the throne Prince Charles.

Despite putting on unconvincing impressions of the royal duo, the presenters were put through to the ward where Kate is being treated and given intimate details about how she was faring.

"She is sleeping at the moment and she has had an uneventful night," a flustered-sounding nurse told the presenters, who called in the early hours of Tuesday morning.

"Sleep is good for her. She's been given some fluids to rehydrate her because she was quite dehydrated when she came in. But she's stable at the moment."

The nurse tells the duo that they would be welcome to come and visit after 9 a.m. when Kate has been "freshened up".   Continued...

 
Members of the media wait outside the King Edward VII hospital in London December 5, 2012. The London hospital treating Prince William's pregnant wife Kate for acute morning sickness admitted on Wednesday it had fallen for a prank call from an Australian radio station, relaying personal details about her condition. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth