French chief rabbi says will not quit over plagiarism scandal

Tue Apr 9, 2013 4:18pm EDT
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By John Irish

PARIS (Reuters) - Gilles Bernheim, the grand rabbi of France, refused to quit on Tuesday despite admitting to several counts of plagiarism and to deception about his academic credentials.

The revelations have shocked France's 600,000-strong Jewish community and he has come under pressure to quit, but Bernheim said that resigning would be a "desertion" as he came clean on one of the faithful's main radio stations in the country.

"It would be an act of pride and against the collegial structure that presides over decisions. I assume my functions fully," Bernheim, 60, a modern Orthodox Jew who was elected grand rabbi in 2008, told Radio Shalom.

"I ask for forgiveness from all those close to me, my family and the community as a whole that I have disappointed," he said.

Bernheim has seemed to be at the height of his career in recent months after his booklet against same-sex marriage laid out the intellectual argument for France's multi-faith movement against the government's plan to legalize it later this year.

The disclosures also come when France's political elite is under intense scrutiny following the resignation of the country's budget minister over a secret foreign account that has created the biggest sleaze scandal of President Francois Hollande's 11-month-old Socialist government.

Bernheim's troubles began last month when a blogger accused him of copying a 1996 text by the late French post-modernist philosopher Jean-Francois Lyotard to use in his 2011 book "Forty Jewish Meditations".

Bernheim responded by saying he was a victim of Lyotard's plagiarism of notes from lectures he had delivered in the 1980s when he was Jewish student chaplain in Paris.   Continued...

French President Francois Hollande (L) greets the Grand Rabbi of France Gilles Bernheim before delivering his New Years speech to French religious leaders at the Elysee Palace in Paris, January 8, 2013. REUTERS/Jacques Brinon/Pool