Evangelical Christians gain political clout in Catholic Brazil

Sun Jun 9, 2013 8:17am EDT
 
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By Anthony Boadle

BRASILIA (Reuters) - When televangelist Silas Malafaia gathered 40,000 followers outside Brazil's Congress this week, it wasn't just to raise their arms to the sky and praise the Lord.

The rally was a show of support for lawmakers who oppose abortion and same-sex marriage and a message to other politicians that they should not ignore Brazil's fast-growing evangelical churches if they want to stay in office.

"Gay activism is moral garbage," Malafaia roared into the microphone to a cheering crowd on the grassy esplanade of the Brazilian capital. "Satan will not destroy our family values."

The rise of evangelical Christians as a conservative political force in Latin America's largest nation has put the ruling Workers' Party on guard and led President Dilma Rousseff - who is seeking re-election in 2014 - to appoint an evangelical bishop to her cabinet.

The growing clout of evangelical churches is also bringing social and moral issues such as abortion to the center of the national agenda, some say at the expense of political and economic reforms needed to restore robust growth to the world's seventh-largest economy.

Pentecostalism was introduced to Latin America by U.S. missionaries a century ago and has gained masses of followers in recent decades in countries like Brazil, especially among the urban poor who feel neglected by the dominant Catholic Church.

With their vibrant preaching, emotional prayer and singing, evangelical Protestant churches appeal to Brazilians more than the liturgical masses of the Catholic Church. They also use electronic and social media more effectively to proselytize.

EXODUS   Continued...

 
Pastor Silas Malafaia, leader of the evangelical church in Brazil, speaks at the "March For Family" demonstration against gay marriage and abortion, in front of the National Congress in Brasilia June 5, 2013. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino