Nazi-looted art found in German parliament: report

Mon Dec 30, 2013 10:30am EST
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By Madeline Chambers

BERLIN (Reuters) - An art historian has found two art works stolen by the Nazis inside Germany's parliament, a newspaper reported on Monday, in a new embarrassment for authorities after a huge stash of looted art came to light last month.

The Bundestag, in a statement issued after the report in Bild newspaper, said an art historian was reviewing two "suspicious cases", but a spokesman would not confirm the find.

The art historian's investigations into the German parliament's art collection, which began in 2012, were continuing, the Bundestag spokesman said.

"It is unclear when there will be a result to the investigations," he said.

Last month German authorities revealed that a trove of Nazi-looted art, valued at 1 billion euros ($1.38 billion), had been found in a Munich apartment.

That collection had been held for decades by Cornelius Gurlitt, the elderly son of an art dealer of part-Jewish descent who was ordered by Hitler to buy up so-called 'degenerate art' and sell it to raise funds for the Nazis.

Bild newspaper said one of the two works discovered in the Bundestag collection had also originally belonged to the Gurlitt family.

Bild said the two works were an oil painting, 'Chancellor Buelow speaking in the Reichstag', by Georg Waltenberger dated 1905, and a chalk lithography entitled 'Street in Koenigsberg' by Lovis Corinth.   Continued...