Science won't stop until it beats AIDS, says HIV pioneer

Fri Oct 9, 2015 2:07am EDT
 
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By Kate Kelland

PARIS Oct 9 (Reuters) - More than 30 years after she identified one of the most pernicious viruses to infect humankind, Francoise Barre Sinoussi, who shared a Nobel prize for discovering HIV, is hanging up her lab coat and retiring.

She's disappointed not to have been able to claim ultimate victory in the battle against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes the killer disease AIDS, but also proud that in three decades, the virus has been beaten into check.

While a cure for AIDS may or may not be found in her lifetime, the 68-year-old says, achieving "remission" - where infected patients control HIV in their bodies and, crucially, can come off treatment for years - is definitely within reach.

"I am personally convinced that remission...is achievable. When? I don't know. But it is feasible," she told Reuters at her laboratory at Paris's Pasteur Institute, where she and her mentor Luc Montagnier discovered HIV in 1983.

"We have 'proof of concept'. We have...the famous Visconti patients, treated very early on. Now it is more than 10 years since they stopped their treatment and they are still doing very well, most of them."

Sinoussi is referring to a study group of 14 French patients known as the Visconti cohort, who started on antiretroviral treatment within 10 weeks of being infected and stayed on it for an average of three years. A decade after stopping the drugs, the majority have levels of HIV so low they are undetectable.

These and other isolated cases of remission, or so-called "functional cure", give hope to the 37 million people worldwide who, due to scientific progress, should now be able to live with, not have their lives cut short by, HIV.

In developed countries at least - and in many poorer ones too - an HIV positive diagnosis is no longer an immediate death sentence, since patients can enjoy long, productive lives in decent health by taking antiretroviral drugs to control the virus.   Continued...

 
Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, French virologist and director of the Regulation of Retroviral Infections Division (Unite de Regulation des Infections Retrovirales) at the Institut Pasteur, poses during an interview with Reuters, in Paris, France, October 1, 2015.  REUTERS/Philippe Wojazer