Carla Bruni says no hidden messages in new album

Wed Nov 19, 2008 4:53pm EST
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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Carla Bruni's new album shot to the top of the charts in France but anyone looking for clues about her love life with her husband, French President Nicholas Sarkozy, won't have any luck.

"They are only songs. It's not so precise about life ... It's not exactly your own real life," Bruni said during an appearance on NBC's Today Show on Wednesday.

Italian-born Bruni, a former supermodel-turned-pop singer who wed Sarkozy in February after a whirlwind romance, released her third album, "Comme si de rien n'etait" (As if nothing had happened), in July.

She performed live on the morning news show as part of a tour to promote the album. Some of its lyrics have caused a stir and prompted a search for hints about past love affairs with intellectuals and rock stars, including Mick Jagger and Eric Clapton, and her marriage to Sarkozy.

One song with the lyrics "You are my drug, more lethal than heroin from Afghanistan, more dangerous than Colombian cocaine," prompted Colombia's government to criticize the song as "hurtful."

Bruni discouraged close analysis of the songs, describing them as simple folk songs that "you play just sitting in your living room ... by the fireplace."

Bruni, who has two earlier albums, admitted to some apprehension about releasing the album after becoming France's first lady.

"At the beginning, I got worried that people might take it wrong, because they are not used to it. Usually first ladies have been supporting their husbands," Bruni explained.

"I thought that maybe for a woman nowadays, you know, it's important to have a job and to keep it," she added.   Continued...

<p>France's President Nicolas Sarkozy (C) arrives with his wife Carla Bruni-Sarkozy (R) at the Douaumont memorial near Verdun, eastern France, November 11, 2008 during ceremonies commemorating the end of WWI. REUTERS/Gerard Cerles/Pool</p>