Susan Boyle says singing for Pope is "dream come true"

Wed Aug 25, 2010 5:45pm EDT
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LONDON (Reuters Life!) - Scottish singing sensation Susan Boyle said on Wednesday that performing for Pope Benedict during his visit to Britain next month was "her greatest dream come true."

Boyle, 49, who became an unlikely world superstar after appearing on the TV show "Britain's Got Talent" last year, will sing three times when the Pope holds a public mass in Glasgow on September 16, the Scottish Catholic Church said in a statement.

One of the songs will be her signature song "I Dreamed a Dream" from "Les Miserables". She will also sing the hymn "How Great Thou Art" and sing a farewell song to Pope Benedict as he leaves the Glasgow public mass for London, to continue his four-day visit.

Boyle, who has never married and once joked she had never been kissed, is a former church worker and a Catholic who used to sing in her local church choir.

"To be able to sing for the Pope is a great honor and something I've always dreamed of -- it's indescribable. I think the 16th of September will stand out in my memory as something I've always wanted to do," Boyle said in a TV interview recorded by the Scottish Catholic media office.

She said she had been approached to sing at the papal mass by Cardinal Keith O'Brien, the president of Scottish bishops' conference.

Boyle's TV appearance as a dowdy contestant with a surprising voice made her an Internet sensation. She went on to release the world's top-selling album of 2009 with more than 9 million copies.

Pope Benedict will be in Britain from September 16-19 on his first state visit to the nation.

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant, editing by Christine Kearney)

<p>Susan Boyle sings "I Dreamed a Dream" on the Danish relief show "The Denmark Collection" to raise money for women in Africa and for the victims of the Haiti earthquake at the Tivoli Concert Hall in Copenhagen January 30, 2010. REUTERS/Casper Christoffersen/Scanpix</p>