Kate Middleton wows crowd in McQueen dress

Fri Apr 29, 2011 9:01am EDT
 
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By Matt Falloon

LONDON (Reuters) - Kate Middleton wore a stunning but simple ivory dress created by Alexander McQueen's Sarah Burton to marry Prince William on Friday, topped off with a tiara on loan from new grandmother-in-law Queen Elizabeth.

Fashionistas across the world had been engulfed in months of fevered speculation over who would get the career-defining job of designing one of the most talked-about outfits of the decade. The dress featured a long train and hand-made lace applique over an ivory-colored bodice and skirt, made of silk and satin. Inspired by the Middleton's new coat of arms, Kate's earrings included diamond oak leaves and pear-shaped diamond acorns.

"It has been the experience of a lifetime to work with Catherine Middleton to create her wedding dress, and I have enjoyed every moment of it," Burton said in a statement.

"It was such an incredible honor to be asked, and I am so proud of what we and the Alexander McQueen team have created."

Burton said Alexander McQueen's designs were about marrying contrasts and hoped the combination of traditional fabrics and lacework with a modern structure and design had created a beautiful dress for the future queen.

Designers agreed likening it to bridal gowns worn by Queen Elizabeth's mother and Grace Kelly when she married Prince Rainier of Monaco.

"The dress is absolutely magical -- it looks like it's been put together by bluebirds," said Angela Buttolph, editor of fashion magazine Grazia's website.

"It is the perfect Disney princess dress for what has been the ultimate Walt Disney fairytale, from the red-jacketed prince charming to the enchanted forest in the abbey and her looking this radiant maiden."   Continued...

 
<p>Kate Middleton arrives to Westminster Abbey for her marriage to Britain's Prince William in central London April 29, 2011. REUTERS/Phil Noble</p>