New York Times names Abramson first woman editor

Thu Jun 2, 2011 3:22pm EDT
 
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By Jennifer Saba

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The New York Times named Jill Abramson as its first woman executive editor, putting her in control of one the world's most respected newspapers as the industry struggles to keep advertisers and readers.

Abramson, 57, will lead the Times newsroom in a new era for papers, when a generation of readers increasingly prefers to get news from online sources such as Twitter, Facebook and a host of websites.

Currently the paper's managing editor, Abramson will succeed Bill Keller, 62, who will become a writer for the New York Times Magazine and for the paper's Sunday opinion section.

Assistant Managing Editor and Washington Bureau Chief Dean Baquet will become managing editor.

Both appointments are effective September 6, the New York Times Co said on Thursday.

It was widely expected that Abramson and Baquet, 54, would rise through the ranks and that one of them would assume the highest editorial position at the paper.

In the spring of last year, Abramson left her position for five months to work on the paper's digital strategy. Three editors -- Baquet, foreign editor Susan Chira and business editor Larry Ingrassia -- took turns serving as managing editor in her absence.

Like many newspapers, the New York Times is trying to reverse a long decline in print advertising revenue, a core piece of its business. Total revenue fell 3.6 percent to $566.5 million during the first quarter, mainly on 7.5 percent drop in print ad revenue. This reflects similar problems at other U.S. newspaper publishers in recent years.   Continued...

 
<p>New York Times managing editor Jill Abramson poses in this undated handout photo. The New York Times on June 2, 2011, named Abramson as its first woman executive editor, putting her in control of one the world's most respected newspapers as the industry struggles to keep advertisers and readers. REUTERS/The New York Times/Handout</p>